Fancy making a motion-tracking eye in a jar?

Using motion detection and a Raspberry Pi Zero W, Lukas Stratmann has produced this rather creepy moving eye in a jar. And with a little bit of, ahem, dissection , you can too! Floating Eye in a Jar With Motion Tracking Made for an Arts seminar I attended for my General Studies, i.e

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Using E Ink displays with a Raspberry Pi

Are you interested in using an E Ink display in your next Raspberry Pi project? Let us help you get started! Weather and new display using a Raspberry Pi Zero and Kindle e-reader by Luke Haas E Ink displays E Ink displays are accessible, they don’t need a lot of power, and they can display content without any power connection whatsoever — think Amazon Kindle if you’ve only a vague knowledge of the technology

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Tackling Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome with Fesentience

In today’s guest post, we’ll hear from Prastik Mohanraj. He’s a part of the Fesentience project team at the Engineering and Science University Magnet school (ESUMS) in Connecticut, USA, and a student of Raspberry Pi Certified Educator Leon Tynes . Prastik shares his story of creating an incubator device using the Raspberry Pi to help young infants suffering from Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS)

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Coolest Projects International 2018

Like many engineers, I have folder upon folder of half-completed projects on my computer. But the funny thing is that this wasn’t a problem for me as a child. Every other Friday evening, I’d spend two hours at Ilkley Computer Club, where I could show off whatever I’d been working on: nothing motivates you to actually finish a project like the opportunity to share it with an audience

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Project Floofball and more: Pi pet stuff

It’s a public holiday here today (yes, again ). So, while we indulge in the traditional pastime of barbecuing stuff (ourselves, mainly), here’s a little trove of Pi projects that cater for our various furry friends. Project Floofball Nicole Horward created Project Floofball for her hamster, Harold

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Raspberry Pi Augmented Reality Projection Lamp Project – Geeky Gadgets

Geeky Gadgets Raspberry Pi Augmented Reality Projection Lamp Project Geeky Gadgets Makers, developers and hobbyists interested in creating amazing things using a Raspberry Pi or similar mini PC may be interested in a new augmented reality Lantern created by Nord Projects. The AR Lantern Has been constructed using an Ikea Tertial lamp ..

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3D-printed speakers from the Technical University of Denmark

Students taking Design of Mechatronics at the  Technical University of Denmark have created some seriously elegant and striking Raspberry Pi speakers. Their builds are part of a project asking them to “explore, design and build a 3D printed speaker, around readily available electronics and components”. The students have been uploading their designs, incorporating Raspberry Pis and HiFiBerry HATs, to Thingiverse throughout April.

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Own your own working Pokémon Pokédex!

Squeal with delight as your inner Pokémon trainer witnesses the wonder of Adrian Rosebrock’s deep learning Pokédex. Creating a real-life Pokedex with a Raspberry Pi, Python, and Deep Learning This video demos a real-like Pokedex, complete with visual recognition, that I created using a Raspberry Pi, Python, and Deep Learning. You can find the entire blog post, including code, using this link: https://www.pyimagesearch.com/2018/04/30/a-fun-hands-on-deep-learning-project-for-beginners-students-and-hobbyists/ Music credit to YouTube user “No Copyright” for providing royalty free music: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PXpjqURczn8 The history of Pokémon in 30 seconds The Pokémon franchise was created by video game designer Satoshi Tajiri in 1995

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Scanning snacks to your Wunderlist shopping list with Wunderscan

Brian Carrigan found the remains of a $500 supermarket barcode scanner at a Scrap Exchange for $6.25, and decided to put it to use as a shopping list builder for his pantry. Upcycling from scraps Brian wasn’t planning to build the Wunderscan. But when he stumbled upon the remains of a $500 Cubit barcode scanner at his local reuse center, his inner maker took hold of the situation.

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