Project Floofball and more: Pi pet stuff

It’s a public holiday here today (yes, again ). So, while we indulge in the traditional pastime of barbecuing stuff (ourselves, mainly), here’s a little trove of Pi projects that cater for our various furry friends. Project Floofball Nicole Horward created Project Floofball for her hamster, Harold

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Gran Check

New Zealander James Zingel recognised his mother’s concern over his grandmother’s well-being, and decided to do something about it. For the Bay of Plenty Science Fair, the 14-year-old Bethlehem College student designed and built ‘Gran Check’, a Raspberry Pi-powered monitor that uses a PIR sensor to recognise his gran’s movement as she feeds her dogs, taking a photograph every morning to email back to his mother

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Twitter for dogs

Henry Conklin’s dog, Oliver, is one of those very vocal dogs who likes to try to let you know what he’s thinking. By barking. A lot.

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Laser Dog Monitor

Dave Young lives in Denver with a baby, a wife, and a dog called Penny. Penny’s a good dog (good dog, Penny!) – she’s a softie around the baby, walks to heel, and doesn’t destroy things.

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No More Woof

No, it isn’t April 1. I have to admit: we’re  very sceptical about the science behind this latest successful Raspberry Pi-powered Indiegogo, which is still at the concept stage; it’s an adorable idea, but backers should be aware that it’s not very likely to bear useable results

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Pi-Rex: a bark-activated door opener for dogs

Here’s a weekend project from Dave Hunt for dog owners whose best friends can’t work out whether they want to be inside or outside. Dave came up with Pi-Rex when the sleep deprivation caused by his new dog barking to be let in or out alternately became too much to bear.

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Judd would like a treat.

Presented without comment, because it’s perfect as it is. Thanks to John (would you believe this is his first ever bit of Python?), and thank you Judd! Python script and CAD design are available at NYCCNC

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