International Women’s Day: Girls at Code Club

On International Women’s Day and every day, Raspberry Pi and Code Club are determined to support girls and women to fulfil their potential in the field of computing. Code Club provides computing opportunities for kids aged nine to eleven within their local communities, and 40 percent of the children attending our 5000-plus UK clubs are girls.

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Tough Pi-ano

The Tough Pi-ano needs to live up to its name as a rugged, resilient instrument for a very good reason: kids. Brian ’24 Hour Engineer’ McEvoy made the Tough Pi-ano as a gift to his aunt and uncle, for use in their centre for children with learning and developmental disabilities such as autism and Down’s syndrome

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The Raspberry Pi Foundation’s Digital Making Curriculum

At Raspberry Pi, we’re determined in our ambition to put the power of digital making into the hands of people all over the world: one way we pursue this is by developing high-quality learning resources to support a growing community of educators. We spend a lot of time thinking hard about what you can learn by tinkering and making with a Raspberry Pi, and other devices and platforms, in order to become skilled in computer programming, electronics, and physical computing.

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Wall-mounted Raspberry Pi games console for kids

YouTuber buildxyz is happy for his kids to play video games, but he’s keen for them to have a properly decent selection, and he wanted something that would look a little better in his living room than your average games console. He also wanted a no-nonsense way to retain parental control over the amount of time the children spend engaging with this particular kind of entertainment.

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Bedbot – furniture with a tech twist

Fine woodwork has always been a mystery to me. I blame the church summer camp I went to when I was nine, where the boys got to build wooden doorknockers shaped like woodpeckers, and the girls – you guessed it – got to paint them with flowers. (This also meant that half the children didn’t get to take a doorknocker home with them at the end of the week.

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Non-formal learning for Syrian refugees

Hundreds of thousands of displaced Syrian children in Lebanon still have no schools. UNICEF innovator James Cranwell-Ward became interested in low-cost technology that could help deliver education for these vulnerable children; he developed an all-in-one Raspberry Pi-based computer system that can be used for programming and electronics as well as learning across a broader curriculum, and in October, refugees aged 10 to 16 attended their first Raspberry Pi class. One student is 11-year-old Zeinab Al Jusuf: You might recognise those screens; they’re a specially developed UNICEF version of Alex Eames’ HDMIPi screen, and Alex wrote about them for us back in May when this project was in the planning stages

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Kano Offers $150 DIY Computer Kit Using Raspberry Pi – CIO Today

CIO Today Kano Offers $150 DIY Computer Kit Using Raspberry Pi CIO Today Built using a Raspberry Pi single-board computer, the Kano kit also comes with a keyboard, speaker and other hardware, although it doesn't include a display monitor. Designed to be easily snapped together Lego-style, the kit — once built — then … UPGRADE your CHILDREN with KANO: All you need in one box Register Kano's DIY computer teaches kids to code, and now it's available to everyone The Verge Kano, The Raspberry Pi -based DIY Computer Set, Will Also Teach Kids To Code PopHerald Technology News all 62 news articles

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